A victory for free speech: Lords vote to axe law banning insults that had led to countless arrests of ordinary people

A victory for free speech: Lords vote to axe law banning insults that had led to countless arrests of ordinary peopleSection 5 of the Public Order Act criminalised ‘insulting’ words and behaviour But it had not defined what the term meant, leading to an abuse of the lawA move by Lord Dear, a former West Midlands chief constable, was backed by 150 votes to 54 | UPDATED: 07:49 GMT, 14 December 2012 Free speech campaigners have hailed a vote by the House of Lords to scrap a draconian law that made it a crime simply to insult someone. The controversial legislation led to countless arrests of ordinary people for making jokes and expressing opinions about religion and sexuality. An amendment to strike out the term 'insult' by Lord Dear, a crossbencher and former West Midlands chief constable, was backed by 150 votes to 54 Section 5 of the Public Order Act criminalised ‘insulting’ words and behaviour – without defining what the term meant.

BBC turns its back on talent and fame as it launches search for Britain"s Brightest

BBC turns its back on talent and fame shows as it launches search for Britain's Brightest Clare Balding will host the new show that will test contestants' intelligenceShow will take prime-time Saturday night slot over from The Voice | UPDATED: 10:30 GMT, 1 December 2012 Forget old-hat singing competitions or watching celebrities fine tune their Waltz, the BBC is launching a new entertainment show to find Britain's Brightest brain. The new show will next year take the prime-time Saturday night slot currently occupied by the much criticised singing contest The Voice. It is hoped Britain's Brightest will help promote intelligence rather than beauty or fame.